May 24th — Jun 29th, 2019
Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf

Bild 002

Installation view
Courtesy the artists; Sies + Höke, Düsseldorf
Photographer Achim Kukulies, Düsseldorf

Location

Sies + Höke
Poststraße 2+3
Düsseldorf

Featured Artists

The artists thank for their help and support C-Print Berlin, Recom ART, Laseranimation Sollinger, Sonderegger AG, Laura Hegewald, Matthias von Stenglin, Lukas Hoffmann, Dr. Joseph Dodds, Bruno Oberhänsli, JustOneOcean, Soneva.


Press release - Please scroll down for German version


Feeling the future, finding our place in the world: Ecopsychoanalytic reflections on 'Future Perfect’ by Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs

Joseph Dodds

The future already traces itself in the present. The future is a promise, and also a warning, and a nostalgic longing not just for a lost past, but for the lost perfect image of the time to come. Past losses and pain are imagined to be replaced with a future perfected. But in doing so the past inscribes itself within the horizons ahead. There’s something coming we don’t want to see, it is hard to accept and feel, anxiety shifting at the edge of awareness, shadows in the dark. Even worse, it is already here. The catastrophe perhaps has already occurred, for Winnicott1 the fear of breakdown is a fear of a breakdown that has already occurred (“dread is just memory in the future tense”). No! I can’t really believe it, look! The sky, the trees, my love. Still here, still alive, it can’t all disappear. Its ok, please say it’s going to be ok.

These images are beautiful and striking, and connect to a yearning to travel and see and connect to the beauty of the world, but it is a world that is already passing, a loss both of the real and of the fantasy. Art may indeed hold a mirror up to nature, but nature is also our mirror, a narcissistic idealized picture postcard, and more like Dorian Gray, an abjected place to expele things we don’t want to see or confront.

The ecological crisis rushes on with a vertiginous speed. The future is coming, the film has jumped forwards too many frames at once, suddenly it arrives. The Anthropocene is accompanied by fractures and systemic collapses, ruptures and disruptions on many levels. Earth systems science focuses on those of the climate, biosphere, extreme weather, mass extinctions, habitat disruption, and the nonlinear feedback loops leading to complex ripples, some of which are dangerously self-amplifying. These ripples are also been felt in disturbances in the psychological and sociocultural spheres, with the increasing amplitude of Bion's 'mad oscillations2. In our dreams, in our feelings, and our art, the Earth is dreaming through us.

Looking through the light shining through sea and plastic and air and glass and the fluids in our eyes. There is a beauty here that is also terrifying. Floating plastic to ensnare the fish. Is it beautiful despite its deadliness, or because of it? As with these images, the scientific findings warning of the dangers we face also illustrate a staggering complexity and beauty, with dynamics involving human and nonhuman, organic and inorganic, chemistry and biology, semiotics and affects, languages and particles.

We don’t seem to have time to feel the feelings we need to. At times it feels too abstract, almost mathematical, we are lost and seek to retreat the familiar world we knew but find it is no longer there. But the feelings are profound, and it’s the feelings we fail to confront that keeps us locked into the future we fear and try avoid thinking about.3 There is loss, melancholy and mourning4. Mourning not only for the loss of a world, but also for the loss of innocence, and for a loss of the imaginary worlds that have always sustained us, just over the hill. Something inside us has emptied, and is hanging there, like rows of empty bottles, hanging from wires. There is terror, the fear of a monster of immense proportions ready to swallow us whole and tear us to pieces, a hyperobject 5 massively distributed in time and space, a leviathan of our own making that is about to devour us and end the age of humanity. And there is guilt, a culpability we desperately want to avoid, we can’t bear to feel. A guilt that can become suicidal or turn outwards as rage, condemnatory moralistic fervour, and cynical nihilism.

We are in a cage of our own making. A psychoanalysis of our culture is required but beyond the means of our clinical practitioners, who are just as much caught up in these psychosocial traps. What rituals can we employ for a mourning too great to be named? How can we cope with the cosmic terror of extinction that confronts us? How can we bear the guilt? How can we face the world we have made and the futures that are already here? Psychoanalysis and ecopsychoanalysis have a role , but we need art, an art that can reach towards the other than human world, both natural and artificial. How can art imagine the relationship between humans and the rest of nature? There are several positions.

Firstly, we have been living for a long time perhaps with a story that portrays humans as masters of the world, above it and dominating and subduing, apart from and separate. The problems this has lead us to are all too apparent. Secondly, we have an ecological vision of a primary union between humans and nature, as deeply interwoven in inseparable ways to the nonhuman, the wider biosphere, we are ecology and not separate from it. At times this leads to the romantic notion of a primary union, that has been shattered by the trauma of separation and disconnection, followed by a Hegelian move to renunion/fusion at a higher level. Thirdly, there is an alternative story from posthumanism and the new materialism. What we fuse with is not only the natural but the synthetic and technological. What new hybrid models can we find through art and life?

Both romantic fusion with nature and the post-humanist hybridity ask humanity to accept its castration: we are not as special as we think we are. But just as omnipotence is a defence against helplessness, ‘helplessness’ can also be a defence against omnipotence. Unfortunately, we are not in fact powerless, but have immense power, dangerously so. Yet we are unable to know how to act or control it. We are like a toddler with a machine gun. As Clive Hamilton7states, theories that diminish human agency and power have arrived precisely when human technology now rivals the great forces of nature. While we may be enmeshed with nature, we also have the power to tear the mesh to pieces, ourselves along with it. Can we acknowledge and accept this power without falling into narcissism or Promethean delusions of grandeur? How can we process this, especially when the 'we' doing the processing includes myriad nonhuman parts in temporary connections, assemblages, and exchanges?

The forms throughout this exhibition move between the natural, the human, and technoscientific and mathematical abstractions. We need an art today that can do precisely this. The ‘nonhuman’ is as much technological and machinic as organic or animal, and equally a cause for ambivalence/desires/fears in terms of fusional fantasies with both. Many of the images here engage with our hybrid natures, recalling Stuart Haygarth’s8 photographs of beach detritus and plastic found during his 450 mile walk along Britain’s coast. The rubbish we discard loses its original function and takes on a second life, as it migrates across the ocean currents on epic voyages, and creates new artificial ‘continents’. The form shifts and changes. The line between beauty, horror and disgust is a fine one. Watching ice fracture into fractal patterns as it melts, is beautiful and hypnotic. Seeing the frozen methane bubbles thus released is both wondrous and apocalyptic, each small bubble a piece of our doom.

Psychoanalytic approaches to symbiosis and liminality9 show they can be sources of terror, that we will lose ourselves as we re/merge with mother and the nonhuman environment, leading to frantic defences to shore up psychological boundaries. I am NOT nature, I am NOT an animal etc. 10The very fragility of these boundaries leads to increasing violence at the border11. But also that his liminality can be transformational, as we follow the ebb and flow of subjectivity-through-connectedness/merger followed by a separation and re-emergence of the self.

Dark forces approach closer, it’s coming, there is a prayer of fear, and holding onto love at the moment of loss. Powerful feelings of awe, gratitude, excitement, and mourning all mixed together. The stew of the Anthropocene. Art can help us to process and come to terms with the awesome scale of life and death. The link between psyche and nature is not only from the inside out (projecting onto nature as a screen, evacuating our beta elements and psychic and material waste). It goes from the outside in. How can we face the end of the world, without denial or being overwhelmed by persecutory or depressive anxieties? There are utopian elements in the art on display here as well, echos of the yearning of our past futures, the futures of our childhood. But something more. There is hope. A hope that is not manic or delusional, but based on a new imagining. The seeds of another future, while perhaps not perfect, are contained as shadows and lines and colours within these images, along with the traces of the past and the terrifying future that is already here

Joseph Dodds PhD is a psychoanalyst in private practice (IPA) based in Prague, a Chartered Psychologist (CPsychol) and Associate Fellow (AFBPsS) of the British Psychological Society, a psychotherapist (UKCP, Czech Association for Psychotherapy), and a university lecturer in psychology and psychoanalysis (University of New York in Prague, AAU). He is the author of the 2011 book Psychoanalysis and Ecology at the Edge of Chaos: Complexity Theory, Deleuze|Guattari, and Psychoanalysis for a Climate in Crisis and of several other book chapters and articles on the application of psychological and psychoanalytic insight into the domains of culture, society, art, film, neuroscience, ecology, and climate change. www.psychotherapy.cz

References

1 Winnicott, D.W. (1974) Fear of Breakdown. Int.R.Psycho-Anal., 1:103-107.

2 Bion, W.R. (1961). Experiences in Groups And Other Papers. London: Tavistock.

3 Dodds, J. (2011) Psychoanalysis and Ecology at the Edge of Chaos: Complexity Theory, DeleuzelGuattari,

and psychoanalysis for a climate in crisis. Routledge.

4 Lertzman, R. (2015) Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic dimensions of engagement. Routledge

5 Morton, T. (2013) Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World. Minnesota

6 Searles, H.F. (1972) Unconscious Proesses in Relation to Environmental Crisis. Psychoanal.Rev.,

7 Hamilton, C. (2017) Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene. Polity

8 Haygarth, S. http://www.stuarthaygarth.com

9 Milner, M. (2010) On Not Being Able to Paint. Routledge

Winnicott, D. W. (2004) Playing and Reality. Routledge.

Searles, H. (1960). The nonhuman environment; in normal development and in Schizophrenia.

New York: International Universities Press.

10 Dodds, J. (2012) Animal Totems and Taboos: An Ecopsychoanalytic Perspective. PSYART: A Hyperlink

Journal for the Psychological Study of the Arts. Available http://www.psyartjournal.com/a...

11 Derrida, J. (2008) The Animal That Therefore I Am. Fordham University Press.



Pressetext

Die Zukunft spüren, unseren Platz in der Welt finden: Ökopsychoanalytische Reflexionen über “Future Perfect” von Taiyo Onorato und Nico Krebs

Joseph Dodds

Die Zukunft deutet sich bereits in der Gegenwart an. Die Zukunft ist ein Versprechen, aber auch eine Warnung und eine nostalgische Sehnsucht nicht nur nach einer verlorenen Vergangenheit, sondern auch nach dem verlorenen perfekten Bild der kommenden Zeit. Wir stellen uns vor, dass vergangene Verluste und Schmerzen durch eine perfektionierte Zukunft ersetzt werden. Aber dadurch schreibt sich die Vergangenheit in die vor uns liegenden Horizonte ein. Es kommt etwas auf uns zu, was wir nicht wahrhaben wollen, etwas, was schwer zu akzeptieren und zu ertragen ist, eine Beklemmung am Rande des Bewusstseins, Schatten im Dunkeln. Schlimmer noch, es ist bereits hier. Die Katastrophe hat möglicherweise schon stattgefunden. Für Winnicott1 ist die Angst vor dem Zusammenbruch die Angst vor einem Zusammenbruch, der bereits stattgefunden hat („Furcht ist nur Erinnerung in der Zeitform Futur“). Nein! Ich kann es einfach nicht glauben, schau! Der Himmel, die Bäume, mein Liebling. Alles noch da, alles am Leben, es kann nicht alles verschwinden. Alles ist gut, bitte sag, dass alles gut wird.

Diese Bilder sind wunderschön und beeindruckend, sie wecken eine Sehnsucht zu reisen und zu sehen und an die Welt und ihre Schönheit anzuknüpfen, aber es ist eine Welt, die bereits im Vergehen begriffen ist, ein Verlust von beidem: der Realität und der Fantasie. Gewiss kann die Kunst der Natur den Spiegel vorhalten, aber auch die Natur ist unser Spiegel, eine narzisstisch idealisierte Postkarte, mehr noch: wie Dorian Gray, ein verworfener Ort, an den wir all das verbannen, was wir nicht sehen oder womit wir uns nicht auseinandersetzen wollen.

Die ökologische Krise schreitet mit schwindelerregendem Tempo voran. Die Zukunft naht, der Film ist zu viele Frames auf einmal vorgesprungen, plötzlich ist sie da. Das Anthropozän wird begleitet von Brüchen und systemischen Zusammenbrüchen, Rissen und Störungen auf verschiedenen Ebenen. Die Erdsystemwissenschaften konzentrieren sich auf die des Klimas, der Biosphäre, extremer Wetterlagen, Massenaussterben, Zerstörung von Lebensraum und die nichtlinearen Rückkopplungseffekte, die zu komplexen Erschütterungen führen, von denen sich einige auf gefährliche Weise selbst verstärken. Diese Erschütterungen sind auch in Störungen in der psychologischen und soziokulturellen Sphäre zu spüren, mit der zunehmenden Amplitude von Bions ‚verrückten Oszilliationen2. In unseren Träumen, in unseren Gefühlen und unserer Kunst träumt die Erde durch uns.

Ein Blick durch das Licht, das durchs Meer, durch Plastik, Luft, Glas und die Flüssigkeiten in unseren Augen scheint. Darin liegt eine Schönheit, die auch furchteinflößend ist. Treibendes Plastik, in dem sich die Fische verfangen. Ist es schön, obwohl es tödlich ist, oder gerade deswegen? So wie diese Bilder illustrieren auch die wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse, die uns vor den drohenden Gefahren warnen, eine atemberaubende Komplexität und Schönheit, mit Dynamiken, die Menschliches und Nichtmenschliches, Organisches und Anorganisches, Chemie und Biologie, Semiotik und Affekte, Sprachen und Partikel umfassen.

Wir scheinen keine Zeit für die Gefühle zu haben, die wir fühlen sollten. Manchmal fühlt es sich zu abstrakt an, beinahe mathematisch, wir sind verloren und versuchen uns in die vertraute Welt, die wir kennen, zurückzuziehen, aber sie existiert nicht mehr. Aber die Gefühle sind tiefgreifend und es sind die Gefühle, die wir nicht zu konfrontieren vermögen, die uns an die Zukunft fesseln, vor der wir uns fürchten und über die wir nicht nachdenken wollen3. Wir empfinden Verlust, Melancholie und Trauer4. Trauer nicht nur um den Verlust einer Welt, sondern auch um den Verlust der Unschuld und um den Verlust der Fantasiewelten, die uns immer Kraft gaben, nur einen Katzensprung entfernt. Etwas in uns hat sich geleert und hängt nun da, wie Reihen leerer Flaschen an Drähten. Wir empfinden Entsetzen, die Angst vor einem Monster riesigen Ausmaßes, das bereit ist, uns ganz zu verschlingen und in Stücke zu reißen, ein Hyperobjekt5, in Raum und Zeit massiv ausgebreitet, ein selbstgeschaffener Leviathan, der uns verschlingen und dem Zeitalter des Menschen ein Ende setzen wird. Und wir empfinden Schuldgefühle, eine Schuld, die wir verzweifelt vermeiden wollen und die wir nicht ertragen können. Eine Schuld, die suizidal werden kann oder sich nach außen richtet, in Form von Wut, verurteilendem moralistischem Eifer und zynischem Nihilismus.

Wir befinden uns in einem selbstgebauten Käfig. Unsere Kultur bedarf einer Psychoanalyse, aber jenseits der Mittel unserer klinischen Fachleute, die genauso sehr in diesen psychosozialen Fallen gefangen sind. Welche Rituale stehen uns zur Verfügung für eine Trauer, die zu groß ist, um sie zu benennen? Wie können wir dieses kosmische Entsetzen im Angesicht der bevorstehenden Vernichtung bewältigen? Wie die Schuld ertragen? Wie können wir der Welt, die wir geschaffen haben, und den Zukünften, die bereits hier sind, begegnen? Psychoanalyse6 und Ökopsychoanalyse spielen eine Rolle, aber wir brauchen Kunst, eine Kunst, die nach einer anderen als der menschlichen Welt greift, einer ebenso natürlichen wie auch künstlichen Welt. Auf welche Weise kann Kunst die Beziehung zwischen Menschen und dem Rest der Natur neu denken? Dazu gibt es verschiedene Ansichten.

Zunächst haben wir vielleicht lange Zeit mit einer Erzählung der Menschen als Herren der Welt gelebt, beherrschend, überlegen und unterwerfend, von der Natur getrennt und abgesondert. Die Probleme, die daraus erwachsen sind, sind nur allzu offensichtlich. Zweitens haben wir die ökologische Vision einer vorrangigen Verbindung zwischen Mensch und Natur, eine tiefe und untrennbare Verwobenheit mit dem Nichtmenschlichen, der weiteren Biosphäre, wir sind Ökologie und nicht abgesondert von ihr. Manchmal führt dies zu dem romantisierten Begriff einer ursprünglichen Verbindung, die durch das Trauma von Absonderung und Trennung zerschlagen wurde, gefolgt von einem Hegelschen Reflex nach Vereinigung/Verschmelzung auf einer höheren Ebene. Drittens gibt es das alternative Narrativ vom Posthumanismus und dem Neuen Materialismus. Wir verschmelzen nicht nur mit dem Natürlichen, sondern auch dem Synthetischen und Technologischen. Welche neuen Hybridmodelle können wir durch Kunst und Leben finden?

Sowohl die romantische Verschmelzung mit der Natur als auch die post-humanistische Hybridität verlangen von der Menschheit, ihre Kastration zu akzeptieren: Wir sind nicht so besonders, wie wir denken. Aber so wie Allmacht ein Schutz gegen die Hilflosigkeit ist, kann ‚Hilflosigkeit‘ auch als Schutz gegen Allmacht dienen. Leider sind wir in Wirklichkeit nicht machtlos, sondern haben vielmehr ungeheure Macht, gefährlich viel Macht. Allerdings verstehen wir nicht, wie damit umzugehen ist bzw. sie zu kontrollieren. Wir sind wie ein Kleinkind mit Maschinengewehr. Nach Clive Hamilton7 sind Theorien über die Einschränkung der menschlichen Handlungsfähigkeit und Macht genau jetzt aufgekommen, da menschliche Technologien mit den großen Naturkräften wetteifern. Auch wenn wir mit der Natur verflochten sein mögen, haben wir zugleich die Macht, dieses Geflecht - und uns selbst mit ihm - in Stücke zu reißen . Können wir diese Macht anerkennen und akzeptieren, ohne dem Narzissmus oder prometheischem Größenwahn anheimzufallen? Wie können wir das verarbeiten, vor allem, wenn das verarbeitende „wir“ eine Myriade nichtmenschlicher Teile in temporären Verbindungen, Gefügen und Austauschprozessen umfasst?

Die Formen in dieser Ausstellung bewegen sich zwischen dem Natürlichen, dem Menschlichen und technowissenschaftlichen und mathematischen Abstraktionen. Wir brauchen heute eine Kunst, die genau dazu in der Lage ist. Das ‚Nichtmenschliche‘ ist ebenso technologisch und maschinell wie es organisch oder animalisch ist – und zugleich die Ursache für Ambivalenz/Verlangen/Ängste in Bezug auf Verschmelzungsfantasien mit beiden. Viele der Bilder sprechen unser hybrides Wesen an und erinnern an Stuart Haygarths8 Fotografien von Strandmüll und -Plastik, den er auf seiner 450-Meilen-Wanderung entlang der britischen Küste fand. Der Müll, den wir wegwerfen, verliert seine ursprüngliche Funktion und beginnt ein zweites Leben, während er sich durch die Meeresströmungen auf epische Reisen begibt und neue künstliche ‚Kontinente‘ formt. Die Form wechselt ständig. Der Grat zwischen Schönheit, Schrecken und Abscheu ist schmal. Zuzusehen, wie Eis in fraktale Muster zerfällt, während es schmilzt, ist wunderschön und hypnotisch. Zu sehen, wie die gefrorenen Methanblasen dabei freiwerden, ist zugleich wundersam und apokalyptisch, jede kleine Blase ein Stück unseres Verderbens.

Psychoanalytische Herangehensweisen an Symbiose und Liminalität9 zeigen, dass sie Quellen des Entsetzens sein können, dass wir uns selbst verlieren, wenn wir mit Mutter und der nichtmenschlichen Umwelt wieder/verschmelzen, was zu verzweifelten Schutzmaßnahmen zur Verstärkung psychologischer Grenzen führt. Ich bin NICHT Natur, ich bin KEIN Tier etc.10 Die Zerbrechlichkeit dieser Grenzen selbst führt zu zunehmender Gewalt an den Grenzlinien 11. Aber diese Liminalität kann auch transformierend sein, wenn wir dem Auf und Ab der Subjektivität-durch-Verbundenheit/Verschmelzung, der nachfolgenden Trennung und dem Wiedererscheinen des Selbst folgen.

Dunkle Kräfte nahen, etwas kommt näher, wir beten vor Angst und halten uns im Augenblick des Verlustes an der Liebe fest. Mächtige Gefühle der Ehrfurcht, der Dankbarkeit, der Aufregung und der Trauer vermischen sich. Der Eintopf des Anthropozäns. Kunst kann uns helfen, die überwältigenden Ausmaße von Leben und Tod zu verarbeiten und unseren Frieden damit zu schließen. Die Verbindung zwischen Psyche und Natur besteht nicht nur von innen nach außen (indem sie auf die Natur wie auf eine Leinwand projiziert und sich unserer Beta-Elemente und unseres psychischen und materiellen Mülls entledigt). Sie verläuft von außen nach innen. Wie können wir dem Ende der Welt entgegentreten, ohne es zu verleugnen oder von Verfolgungsängsten oder depressiven Ängsten überwältigt zu werden? Die hier ausgestellte Kunst enthält auch utopische Elemente, Echos der Sehnsucht nach unseren vergangenen Zukünften, den Zukünften unserer Kindheit. Aber da ist mehr. Es gibt Hoffnung. Keine manische oder illusorische Hoffnung, sondern eine auf neuer Vorstellungskraft basierende Hoffnung. Die Samen einer neuen Zukunft, die vielleicht nicht perfekt ist, aber als Schatten, Linien und Farben in diesen Bildern enthalten ist, zusammen mit den Spuren der Vergangenheit und der beängstigenden Zukunft, die bereits eingetreten ist.

Joseph Dodds Ph.D.
ist privat praktizierender Psychoanalyst (IPA) mit Sitz in Prag, akkreditierter Psychologe (CPsychol) und Associate Fellow (AFBPsS) der British Psychological Society, Psychotherapeut (UKCP, Czech Association for Psychotherapy) und Universitätsdozent für Psychologie und Psychoanalyse (University of New York in Prag, AAU). Er ist Autor des 2011 erschienenen Buchs Psychoanalysis and Ecology at the Edge of Chaos: Complexity Theory, Deleuze|Guattari, and Psychoanalysis for a Climate in Crisis und zahlreicher anderer Kapitel und Artikel zur Anwendung psychologischer und psychoanalytischer Erkenntnisse auf die Bereiche Kultur, Gesellschaft, Kunst, Film, Neurowissenschaften, Ökologie und Klimawandel. www.psychotherapy.cz

Quellen

1 Winnicott, D.W. (1974) Fear of Breakdown. Int.R.Psycho-Anal., 1:103-107.

2 Bion, W.R. (1961). Experiences in Groups And Other Papers. London: Tavistock.

3 Dodds, J. (2011) Psychoanalysis and Ecology at the Edge of Chaos: Complexity Theory, Deleuzel Guattari,

and psychoanalysis for a climate in crisis. Routledge.

4 Lertzman, R. (2015) Environmental Melancholia: Psychoanalytic dimensions of engagement. Routledge

5 Morton, T. (2013) Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World. Minnesota

6 Searles, H.F. (1972) Unconscious Proesses in Relation to Environmental Crisis. Psychoanal.Rev.

7 Hamilton, C. (2017) Defiant Earth: The Fate of Humans in the Anthropocene. Polity

8 Haygarth, S. http://www.stuarthaygarth.com

9 Milner, M. (2010) On Not Being Able to Paint. Routledge

Winnicott, D. W. (2004) Playing and Reality. Routledge.

Searles, H. (1960). The nonhuman environment; in normal development and in Schizophrenia.

New York: International Universities Press.

10 Dodds, J. (2012) Animal Totems and Taboos: An Ecopsychoanalytic Perspective. PSYART: A Hyperlink

Journal for the Psychological Study of the Arts. Available http://www.psyartjournal.com/a...

11 Derrida, J. (2008) The Animal That Therefore I Am. Fordham University Press.


More on Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

Contact

For further information please contact Marta Niskiewicz via e-mail or call +492113014360.

  • Monday—Friday
    10.00 am—6.30 pm
  • Saturday
    12.00 am—2.30 pm